Tennessee officials admit granting unfair advantages in the business world

Tennessee officials admit granting unfair advantages in the business world

Some suspected it and, at some point they supposed, the confession was inevitable.

The state of Tennessee came out of the closet this week and admitted what everyone else had known for years. In court documents, the state more or less said it would grant certain people advantages over others in the business world and create an unfair playing field — for political reasons.

As reported, people who want a license to shampoo must take hundreds of hours in coursework costing thousands of dollars. The Beacon Center of Tennessee, a free market think tank, announced last month it’s suing the state to remove those regulations.

“Much of what states do is to favor certain groups over others on economic grounds. We call this politics,” members of the Tennessee Attorney General’s Office said in their official response.

RINSE AND CLEAN: The state of Tennessee has stringent regulations when it comes to shampooing (photo courtesy of Flickr.com and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

RINSE AND CLEAN: The state of Tennessee has stringent regulations when it comes to shampooing (photo courtesy of Flickr.com and https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

The response also said states can “engage in economic preference.”

Harlow Sumerford, spokesman for Tennessee Attorney General Herb Slatery, told Tennessee Watchdog his office does not comment on pending litigation.

Sumerford said the opinion comes not from Slatery’s office but from a past opinion from the Federal Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

Beacon Center President Justin Owen said he “was appalled by the state’s response.”

“When they cite the federal courts they are essentially endorsing that perspective, and they are arguing it is the proper role of the Legislature to favor certain groups over others on economic grounds — otherwise they would not have incorporated that into their response,” Owen said.

“We were pretty shocked they’d go so far as to argue that it is proper for the government to effectively pick winners and losers and engage in economic preferences when it comes to something like occupational licensing.”

ALSO OF INTEREST — Tennessee forces taxpayers to invest in industrial parks not attracting business

Braden Boucek, Beacon’s litigation director, said last month these state regulations aren’t necessary to protect to health and safety.

Herb Slatery (photo courtesy of the Tennessee Attorney General's Office)

Herb Slatery (photo courtesy of the Tennessee Attorney General’s Office)

“These sorts of laws are designed to create fees to pay for the boards that regulate them and to restrict competition from people already in the field,” Boucek said last month.

Other coursework requirements, Boucek said, include detailed instructions on rinsing hair, draping clients with clean towels and treating hazardous waste — assuming clients start gushing blood.

There’s even a class on answering phone calls, Boucek said.

No school in Tennessee offers these courses, he said, adding the only alternative is a cosmetology license, requiring 1,500 hours of classwork and upwards of $35,000 in tuition, Boucek said.

The Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance, which oversees the state’s cosmetology board, has thus far declined comment.

Contact Christopher Butler at chris@tennesseewatchdog.org 

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  • mark nightwolf

    Bias can be clearly shown in Knox county School system.

    One thing i saw clearly while living man years in Knoxville is the Public Sector corruption that runs rampart over the citizens from forced by threat wheel taxes against the popular vote to increased property taxes during a full blown Recession, but the worst part of all even greater than the good old boy sheriffs dept was the schools. Knox county made serious effort an spent countless tax dollars to advertise how we needed a new school in Harden Valley, not just a school but an academy. Lets look at that word from an educated perspective. a·cad·e·my, a place of study or training in a special field; or a society or institution of distinguished scholars, artists, or scientists, that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field. This all sounds good but for whom did this school benefit? Those with high financial means, a sort of rich city school in a supposedly diverse system. At the time the School system was very thrilled publicly with the work being done by the Knox County Schools Superintendent a Dr. Jim McIntyre,

    To me whom had moved to the Carter School District as West Knoxville was getting far too busy became a real show to behold. My kids being very active played sports and were first to play the new Academy, right away the Economic in-balance was clear to see best of Everything in terms of gear was shown while the poor Carter kids had torn Jerseys and wore out helmets and pads, while the Academy players looked like a Pro NFL team taking the field. Throughout the first half Carter pounded the new players but when they had time to talk seemed the coaches had a deal in mind and the players morale went in the tank at the spectacle of grandeur that was the Academy.

    I think back to other schools we played before the new Academy went in, Carter lost its Driver Ed program to make budget cuts for the Rich kids Academy to be built, and all Carters Vocational and fine arts programs were cut many classes were terminated like Welding. Even the Artistic kids was not spared as the Academy was the Superintendents trophy love child so to say in so much that every resource of the finest was taken for each district to fill the needs of this new School, an Academy which filled the needs of the Wealthy students at the risk of the most disadvantaged.

    Sadly Carter with its buildings falling in and extremely low per student share of the tax revenue was not alone in the suffering for the Academy. Gibbs, Sunny view and Austin East all had similar experiences where the Vast majority of Vocational and Fine Arts Struggled to function and many programs went by the wayside to make room for one RICH KIDS SCHOOL and the Hoarding nature of the School Board to build something unique to justify the Knox County Schools Superintendent Jim McIntyre’s extravagant salary and over inflated EGO at the expense of the poor Children this so called Educator was hired to help to begin with.

    With Carters art Program with loss of its Kiln to the Academy at its Choir and Band Suffering and most vocational classes Canceled and the sporting team in rags it was time for us as a family to relocate as the Academy was not offered to all the students but to one geographic region.

    If truth be know i feel a study or freedom of information act should be filed to see if the so called experts at the Knox county School Board ever studied the distribution of funding on a per student basis. I feel if such a Quantitative study was done it would show the bias associated with the rampant corruption bu its School Board and superintendent Jim McIntyre. It is my opinion a investigation should be done as the tax payers were deceived by this so called leader and his failure has resulted in many districts children’s lives and educational experiences ruined as well as there socioeconomic opportunities at an equal future!

    The Academy’s real cost will be felt for generations and Knox County Schools Superintendent Jim McIntyre is a Ego maniac with little concern for the students just his image!

    From a PHD in common sense!
    Mark NightWolf

  • mark nightwolf

    Bias can be clearly shown in Knox county School system.

    One thing i saw clearly while living man years in Knoxville is the Public Sector corruption that runs rampart over the citizens from forced by threat wheel taxes against the popular vote to increased property taxes during a full blown Recession, but the worst part of all even greater than the good old boy sheriffs dept was the schools. Knox county made serious effort an spent countless tax dollars to advertise how we needed a new school in Harden Valley, not just a school but an academy. Lets look at that word from an educated perspective. a·cad·e·my, a place of study or training in a special field; or a society or institution of distinguished scholars, artists, or scientists, that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field. This all sounds good but for whom did this school benefit? Those with high financial means, a sort of rich city school in a supposedly diverse system. At the time the School system was very thrilled publicly with the work being done by the Knox County Schools Superintendent a Dr. Jim McIntyre,

    To me whom had moved to the Carter School District as West Knoxville was getting far too busy became a real show to behold. My kids being very active played sports and were first to play the new Academy, right away the Economic in-balance was clear to see best of Everything in terms of gear was shown while the poor Carter kids had torn Jerseys and wore out helmets and pads, while the Academy players looked like a Pro NFL team taking the field. Throughout the first half Carter pounded the new players but when they had time to talk seemed the coaches had a deal in mind and the players morale went in the tank at the spectacle of grandeur that was the Academy.

    I think back to other schools we played before the new Academy went in, Carter lost its Driver Ed program to make budget cuts for the Rich kids Academy to be built, and all Carters Vocational and fine arts programs were cut many classes were terminated like Welding. Even the Artistic kids was not spared as the Academy was the Superintendents trophy love child so to say in so much that every resource of the finest was taken for each district to fill the needs of this new School, an Academy which filled the needs of the Wealthy students at the risk of the most disadvantaged.

    Sadly Carter with its buildings falling in and extremely low per student share of the tax revenue was not alone in the suffering for the Academy. Gibbs, Sunny view and Austin East all had similar experiences where the Vast majority of Vocational and Fine Arts Struggled to function and many programs went by the wayside to make room for one RICH KIDS SCHOOL and the Hoarding nature of the School Board to build something unique to justify the Knox County Schools Superintendent Jim McIntyre’s extravagant salary and over inflated EGO at the expense of the poor Children this so called Educator was hired to help to begin with.

    With Carters art Program with loss of its Kiln to the Academy at its Choir and Band Suffering and most vocational classes Canceled and the sporting team in rags it was time for us as a family to relocate as the Academy was not offered to all the students but to one geographic region.

    If truth be know i feel a study or freedom of information act should be filed to see if the so called experts at the Knox county School Board ever studied the distribution of funding on a per student basis. I feel if such a Quantitative study was done it would show the bias associated with the rampant corruption bu its School Board and superintendent Jim McIntyre. It is my opinion a investigation should be done as the tax payers were deceived by this so called leader and his failure has resulted in many districts children’s lives and educational experiences ruined as well as there socioeconomic opportunities at an equal future!

    The Academy’s real cost will be felt for generations and Knox County Schools Superintendent Jim McIntyre is a Ego maniac with little concern for the students just his image!

    From a PHD in common sense!
    Mark NightWolf

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